silvermini3
By Moira Allen http://www.pet-loss.net....

"The painful truth is that if your pet is terminally ill, and especially if it is suffering and unable to function, it will die; the decision you must make is not whether its life will end, but how, and how much discomfort you are willing to allow it to endure."

What I took away from this is that although we are choosing to end their life before it happens naturally (which isn't always the best way), we are really choosing to end their suffering. It's a noble deed.
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Weepatchesoflove
Hey Silvermini
I think that you will have managed to help a few people with your post ~ it seems so many of us are fighting with the guilt of "having done wrong" with our guys at the end and I think your comment, should hopefully put some people's mind at rest a wee bit.
I just wanted to thank you for taking the time out to post this.
Take care and best wishes
Michelle &Patches
Patches mum
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jimmy17
Hi Silvermini - how I agree with this statement. I was devastated when we had no choice other than to let our 17 year old dog Jim go peacefully - he was an old boy with numerous health issues, and it would have served no purpose to let him suffer any longer.  Seven weeks ago, I watched my mother-in-law slowly die - even though she was in pain, we had to wait until the bitter end, her life was prolonged with the usual drugs etc - my husband and in-laws all said how is it that we can let our animals go peacefully with dignity, yet we humans have to wait until life is unbearable.      Animals really do have the better deal.  
                                                                                  Jackie
J Taylor
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Weepatchesoflove
Hiya Jackie.
Sorry for the loss of your mother in law, but you are right watching a relative suffer a slow painful end is excruciating and we at least can help our animal family go with dignity and hopefully a wee bit less pain. I know my mum lasted way too long, but fortunately for her she was absolutely bonkers at the end, so she didn't really know, as the indignity of how she ended up would have killed her a whole lot quicker. Until I read your post, I'd forgotten feeling rage at the hospital on her last weekend, thinking if this was Patches I'd never put her through this. Why do we let our human family suffer like this?
I also have a thing about the pain that our guys can be in, I suffer from RA and I am in pain, but some days are way much worse than others, but at least on these days I can up my meds and take breakthrough stuff, but our guys don't have that option they have to wait till we dole out the prescribed amount by the vet and I had always worried (wrongly as it turned out) what I would do if Patches got bad with arthritis. Would I absolutely drug her, or worry over her that she didn't have enough meds. Never thought of it before, but she saved me from that too! I think it is the hardest, but kindest thing to do ever. We love our guys and pretty much most things done through love is always the right thing. And by all sounds, the Rainbow Bridge sounds really cool - it's just us down here who suffer!
Again, I'm sorry for you and your families loss and hope it doesn't cause you too much stress.
Take care and best wishes
Michelle &Patches
Patches mum
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jimmy17
Thanks Michelle,  I also used to wonder about Jim`s medication and whether or not it was enough.  He had been diagnosed with a liver tumour 3 years before we lost him, and it was decided that as his liver enzyme count was way off the scale, plus he was 14 at the time that it would be unfair to put him through a surgical proceedure.   He spent the next 3 years on medication, and to be honest you would never have known anything was wrong with him - he still enjoyed life to the full.  But looking back, I often wonder if he was simply masking any pain he may have been feeling - deep down I think I would have known if he was, but its as you say, we have that option of upping our dose, but our little ones do not.
 Anyways, I know they are ALL having a great time over the Bridge - fully restored to health and youth, just waiting for that day when we`ll all be reunited forever!!
                                                                                        Hugs, Jackie
J Taylor
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Weepatchesoflove
Hey Jackie,
I'm sorry how I worded that, and I hope that you are not second guessing yourself on Jims meds, I was meaning that I would have probably ended up drugging Patches at the first sign of a limp. As you say, we know our guys more than we know any other and there would be signs ~ hesitations before moving, being off of their food (unfortunately, I never, ever have that, I tend to comfort eat)! and just differentness if you know what I mean. I know I am only trying to find positives in Patches going when she did - forever the optimist I guess!
I hope I never caused you any hassles
Take care and best wishes
Michelle x
Patches mum
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jimmy17
Hi Michelle,  NO! - don`t worry! Even when Jim was still here I often used to worry about his levels of medication. At his age he often slept for hours on end, and I sometimes wondered whether he was getting too big a dose which was knocking him out, and other times, especially his last few months I thought the complete opposite and was he getting enough ?  The amount of times poor Jim was bundled into the car for a  trip to his vet just to make sure ( nearly always unnessesary ) that things were ok !   I guess it shows how very much we cared for them - and how much they relied on us for their every need.  I just wish every animal was given the love and care shown to Patches and Jim, and all the other little animals we get to know on this forum.  

                                                                               Hugs, Jackie xx
J Taylor
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jessie2000
Jackie,
I agree with you when you say animals really do have the better deal.
My Mom died in July 2002 from alzheimers & parkinsons. She was 72. Dad kept her 
at home for as long as he could, but she finally had to go into a nursing home
and that is where she died.
My Dad died in January 2015 from ALS. He was 87. I did my best to help Dad with
things like grocery shopping, running errands, doctors appointments etc... Plus we had 
in home care visits for bathing, housecleaning etc...
I had Dad on waiting lists with 3 nursing homes. A room became available at one of the nursing
homes. Dad died the day before he was going to move there.
So sadly, I saw both my parents decline slowly and pass away. 
Jessie has been gone for 6 weeks now. She was 16 and I had her put to sleep.
She had so many health issues and yes I do feel guilty, but deep down I guess
I know I didn't want her to suffer anymore. Jessie, I miss you so much. Love Dad.

Richard S.
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jimmy17
Hi Richard, I am so sorry for you losses - you did the kindest thing possible for Jessie as nothing is worse than seeing our pets suffer. It is only 6 weeks for you, so it is still so hard adapting to life without her.     We had to have our 17 year old dog Jim put to sleep 7 months ago and I still miss him so much, but with all his health problems we really had no choice.     As I said, animals do get the better deal - my uncle has motor neurone disease, and in all probability has less than a year to live.  He has actually spoken about going to the clinic in Switzerland for an " assisted death",  as the last stages of MND are dreadful.   We are able to spare our animals from so much pain by helping them pass peacefully, but have no option than to see our loved family and friends suffer so much pain and indignity. 
                                                                                              Take care, Jackie
J Taylor
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winstonsmom12
That quote is exdactly why I made my decision for Winston.  I pray everyday I spared him any needless suffering.  Thank You.  Sue
Susan
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silvermini3
Me too, winstonsmom12, as hard as it was....
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NormaT
My sister died 2 years ago. Second bout of cancer -she was 55. She knew there was no hope and declined treatment. Only asked for pain relief but the "professionals" denied her dignity in death because they feared being seen to be speeding up her death by giving her strong pain relief. She COULD communicate how much pain she was in.
She asked us to help her pass and if I could have gotten away with it I would have done so.
When Spike was first put to sleep I was consumed with guilt. Starting to come to terms with it now - 5 months later. Still miss him so much and it's a long journey but the realisation that we did the right thing FOR HIM has eventually sunk in.
I visit here just about every day. This site has been the biggest comfort,especially on darker days when family tell you to move on.
Norma
Norma 
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SadieMom
silvermini3 wrote:
By Moira Allen http://www.pet-loss.net....

"The painful truth is that if your pet is terminally ill, and especially if it is suffering and unable to function, it will die; the decision you must make is not whether its life will end, but how, and how much discomfort you are willing to allow it to endure."

What I took away from this is that although we are choosing to end their life before it happens naturally (which isn't always the best way), we are really choosing to end their suffering. It's a noble deed.


I have to be honest. Although I found that particular passage about terminal illness helpful, I read through the rest of the website and found it it be mostly biased and very badly written. I have yet to meet a pet owner for whom bargaining is their strongest emotion, and I have yet to meet an owner that is so mired in emotion that they cannot determine if their pet is alive or dead. The articles on that website are NOT good. TI suspect that the author had good intentions when he/she created the site, but the whole thing is dangerously amateurish.
If love could have kept you alive, you would have been here forever.  Mama loves you Miss Wiggles <3
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jessie2000
Jackie,
Thank you for your reply.
I'm so sorry to hear your uncle has MND.
My dad had ALS (Lou Gehrigs Disease) which is the most common type of MND.
Dad lost 60 pounds in the last year because he had difficulty eating/swallowing.
Dad refused the feeding tube that the specialist in Denver suggested.
I can understand why your uncle is considering assistance from the clinic in Switzerland.
Take care.
Richard S.
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