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lpresley
I have an 8 year old black Pomeranian named Roscoe.  We found him so I am not sure what his previous life was like but he is the sweetest dog.  He wasn't fixed when I found him so shortly after I fixed him.  He then gained tons of weight and is now around 16 pounds, which is not good for all his other health issues.  I have him on a strict diet but it doesn't seem to help.  He has Cardiomegaly (enlarged heart), hip issues, thyroid issues, and the most recent issue is COPD.
He hacks all the time and within the last two months it seems to be getting worse.  His breathing as become hard for him and very crackly.  He is on so many medications for all his issues I am not sure what else to do at this point.  The doctor has one other suggestion that I haven't tried yet (next step) and that is to do breathing treatments, same as you would for a person with asthma.
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Lia

lpresley
This is many months later so I don't know if this will help but I will pass on what I have found. The weight is the biggest issue. I stopped using Prednisone and stared using a rescue inhaler instead (with attachment for dogs), plus a strict diet the weight came right off. Now four years later I'm looking for more invasive measures because the the disease is progressive.  If you would like any for information let me know.

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tipsu
Lia wrote:

lpresley
This is many months later so I don't know if this will help but I will pass on what I have found. The weight is the biggest issue. I stopped using Prednisone and stared using a rescue inhaler instead (with attachment for dogs), plus a strict diet the weight came right off. Now four years later I'm looking for more invasive measures because the the disease is progressive.  If you would like any for information let me know.




Hello!

I just read at "my dog has COPD" that you have stopped using Prednisone and started using inhaler. What kind of inhaler and does it help? How long you have used it? Does it help as well as Prednisone?
What kind of dog you have and how old is she/he? How long your dog have had COPD? Did/does your dog cough a lot?
My 14 and half years old Tibetan Spaniel just was diagnosed with COPD :(  He coughs a lot. Now he's better because of the Prednisone, but I wouldn't like to use it because it has so much side effects and in long-term use it makes my dog weaker... I would really appreciate if you can tell me more about other medications and treatments you have used! Thank you!
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Lia
tipsu,
Belle has had COPD for almost 5 years now (not 4 years like I thought before). She is a 14 year old miniature poodle. Prednisone is very hard on the hart if taken for an extended period. Belle has a hart murmur and slightly enlarged hart so we didn't want to give her anything that could make it worse. Plus Prednisone has been linked to. congestive heart failure. I use the flovent inhaler twice a day and it last 3 months. It works great but it is very expensive. Our vet recommended a homeopathic vet that has prescribed lung healing vitamins like NAC, lilly bulb, and others. She is also taking an allergy med that is very helpful. Our vet has been amazed by her good health even though it is still progressing she is able to run short distances and feels good. You need to keep an eye on his hart. With COPD you are less likely to notice if he developes congestive heart failure. I suggest getting an x-ray at least once a year and if he starts coughing more at night than in the past that can be a sign. I had Belle allergy tested and found out she is extremely allergic to chicken and eggs plus slightly allergic to grain. Switching her food made a big difference (in the beginning) with her breathing. 
I hope this helps.
Lia
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hbgmysite
i hope your dog gets better, will be praying for you and your dog....... ;( ;(
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Elvin
Hi, my Jack Russell (Humphrey Bogart) has developed COPD, and it came from him having heart worms according to the vet. She has tried him on two different types of Bronchodilators, and they're upsetting his stomach. He seems to have most of his stomach problems in the middle of the night ,and leaves me a mess every night. 
He's house broken and never has accidents in the house without being sick to his stomach.
I'm wondering if there's anyone who might know of a holistic way I can treat him and it not upset his stomach? He's very special to me and I know eventually he'll pass away as all of my other dogs in the past. 
However, he's the first small dog I've ever had and he's so much more endearing than a large dog. Although, he's very endearing and loves me so much I'm really getting tired of  finding a mess every morning before I can start my day. 
The vet tells me she'd like to put him on steroids since he's not responding positively to the bronchial dilators (stomach), but I don't want him on steroids. He's a bit over-weight but has lost some weight since I found out he has COPD. Knowing the steroids makes him want to eat more I am at my wits end on how to help him. 
He got the heartworms in case someone might be interested or think it's my fault. He was a rescue, and the people who previously had him didn't monitor his play time and he somehow contracted those horrific worms. 
Fortunately I got him right after he had gotten the heartworms so the vet said they probably would never be a problem, and now she tells me he has COPD due to the worms. 
What to do? 
If anyone has any ideas please let me know...
Thanks so much...:-)
Hi, my Jack Russell (Humphrey Bogart) has developed COPD, and it came from him having heart worms according to the vet. She has tried him on two different types of Bronchodilators, and they're upsetting his stomach. He seems to have most of his stomach problems in the middle of the night ,and leaves me a mess every night. He's house broken and never has accidents in the house without being sick to his stomach.I'm wondering if there's anyone who might know of a holistic way I can treat him and it not upset his stomach? He's very special to me and I know eventually he'll pass away as all of my other dogs in the past. However, he's the first small dog I've ever had and he's so much more endearing than a large dog. Although, he's very endearing and loves me so much I'm really getting tired of  finding a mess every morning before I can start my day. The vet tells me she'd like to put him on steroids since he's not responding positively to the bronchial dilators (stomach), but I don't want him on steroids. He's a bit over-weight but has lost some weight since I found out he has COPD. Knowing the steroids makes him want to eat more I am at my wits end on how to help him. He got the heartworms in case someone might be interested or think it's my fault. He was a rescue, and the people who previously had him didn't monitor his play time and he somehow contracted those horrific worms. Fortunately I got him right after he had gotten the heartworms so the vet said they probably would never be a problem, and now she tells me he has COPD due to the worms. What to do? If anyone has any ideas please let me know...Thanks so much...:-)
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Bookiedookie
Dear Twig

We lost our Yorkie 4 weeks ago today to copd. She was diagnosed at 8 & made it all the way to 14 & one month with very good quality of life. Has your pooch been neutered? If so watch the weight with the steroid as it makes them constantly hungry so you'll feel like being cruel to be kind when he's pestering you to feed him.

My vet also prescribed 100mg of corvental capsules everyday & put her on ventolin which we administered through a baby nebuliser. Steroids cause thining of the skin, pot belly, weak joints & baldness around the back & tail also known as cushings disease. Unfortunately it's the lesser of two evils which didn't start to effect our Bookie until the last twelve months of her life apart from the pot belly. If he hasn't been neutered then his hormones will control his weight much better than it would without them.

When she was diagnosed the vet said three month life expectancy without medication & two years with the medication. We made it an extra six years by making little changes & buying apparatus to support her environment which I'll mention shortly.

Is your dog forcing the air out of the lungs by squeezing from the abdomen when they exhale? If so then it's a good bet it is copd.

If you smoke then obviously don't smoke in the house. Don't spray anything around him such as air freshener, deodorant, perfume, basically anything that can be sprayed don't spray it around him.

Keepnlg him cool is a must. Buy a squat fan that sits at floor level & keep it on in the summer. If you an afford it also buy an air conditioning unit for wherever he sleeps. Our Bookie slept on top of our bed. Even that was enough to make her overheat even in winter months. Oh & watch the central heating. We also bought an electronic nebuliser that turned water to steam through ultrasonic means & just held it near her nose but taking him in the bathroom & closing the door whilst someone has a hot shower has the same effect.

We did all this through just watching & learning. My vet moved practice halfway through treatment. When he eventually saw her again after 18 months his exact words were 'wow!'.

Collapsed trachea is also common in these yorkies but you'll need an X-ray to determine that. Bookie also had this on top of the copd.

Forgot to mention if he's a dog that wolves his food down then be careful. Swallowing big lumps can irritate the throat & dog chews are an absolute no no as Bookie aspirated on one & we nearly lost her two years ago. We found feeding her little & often was best as giving her a big meal all at once obviously fills their tiny tummies. This in turn restricts the movement of the diaphragm & they can struggle breathing after eating large amounts. It's also quite distressing to watch until the tummy starts to empty. So, little & often we found was definitely best.

I know I sound like the grim reaper but if it is copd then it can be managed & your dog will live to his old age & with good quality of life. Bookie could still chase our cat at full speed & that was up to three days before she died.

Get a second opinion but it is very common in terrier type dogs as is collapsed trachea.

You will notice all this & probably more as you go along & learn to manage what's best for your dog. Oh don't feed him anything sharp like crisps this can set a cough if that lasts a week & can really take it out of um.

Hope this helps & doesn't sound to grim but keep him on the steroids until you get that second opinion. They really help despite the side effects. Bookie was 5kg & took one 1mg steroid everyday for just over six years.

Study his behaviours if it is copd & go with your instincts. I did & she lived practically a normal life.

Good luck...
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tamsenvn
Hoping you get to keep her around for a long time. The precious little things manage to wrap those paws around our hearts for sure. I changed my profile pic to my Yorkie. She was right at 12 when that was taken, (a year ago). dầu quả óc chó
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