Cockermom
My husband and I, after several times of saying to each other "It's time", finally made an appointment for tomorrow (6/2) to help our Danny boy (15 year old Cocker Spaniel) cross over.     Besides being 15 and having a heart murmur, his eyesight is almost gone and his cognitive responses slowing, and he has been suffering with Cushings Disease for the past 18 months.  The muscle in his back legs is almost gone and he now collapses regularly trying to walk. He gets stuck on the floor and has trouble (if at all) getting back up,  and recently he's been getting stuck trying to go through the doggie door.  He has been stuck in his own bed and on the floor in his own feces and I end up having to wisk him off to the bathroom to put him in the tub. He even collapses and poops while I bathe him!  His skin is all crusty and he has been quite cranky with our new rescue pup. He's on all sorts of medications, including pain meds.   He still eats and drinks most of the time, although it is hard for him to keep his body stable enough to eat as he has to sit down.  Here's the challenge: When he collapses and we pick him back up, he teeters off wagging his little tail like "the little engine who could"!  This is what is making me ache inside.  His attitude and his determination is so amazing, but his body, and now at times his mind, just seem to be failing him.  We work during the day and have a camera on him, but I fear I will log on and see him stuck in the dog door or floor and be helpless to assist him.  I have kind of prayed he would just pass on his own. Euthanasia just feels like (dare I use this word-murder?!).   We had to have his litter mate euthanized last March for cancer but it is not any easier.    I don't want to have regrets, but I don't want my boy to suffer any longer.  This does not feel like a dignified quality of life.    Just hearing someone else's experience would be helpful.  I know they say "you'll know when it's time" and I'm already second guessing myself again.
Mimi Zwart
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Chinadoll
Mimi, first let me offer my sympathy for what you have to do, it is never easy, ever. You and your husband are going through the same thing my wife and I went through last year. Danny sounds like a wonderful beautiful fur baby, I can tell from your words how much you both love him, and also how much this decision is so difficult to face. From what I read above, it sounds like his quality of life is slowly fading, to the point that you now have to do the most difficult but the most loving thing you can do. We were also told by our vet that we would 'know' when it was time, and I guess we did. We went to bed so many times saying that tomorrow we were calling the vet but in the morning our dog Nicky would do something that made us think 'he is still holding on'. However, these little angels are so good at hiding pain and discomfort and the littlest thing can get their tail wagging. He got to where he had to have us help him up almost everytime. We carried him outside and carried him back because he could no longer use the doggy door. He made mistakes in the house which for 16 years he never made one. I could tell he was upset with himself each time an accident happened, he hated it. The number of pills he had to take daily was a huge challenge and required really creative thinking on our part to get them in him. He no longer could go for walks, which he loved, his eyesight was terrible and his hearing was very weak. All of these conditions just got worse and worse, with a little uptick every now and then. I guess for us, it did become clear one morning, it was his time, he truly was a fighter and I don't think he would have ever given up. We prayed for him to pass in his sleep, but this was not going to happen I guess. He got to the point where I could tell that he did not even know where he was, he was lost in the house he was raised in for 17 1/2 years, that was so sad. We had the vet come to our house, he passed so peacefully with us beside him, it broke my heart but I knew it was time to let go of him and do what was best. He went to a heavenly home and is whole again. Nicky was a proud dog, a strong guy, he was our 'little man', but in the end, he was just a shell of himself. He did eat every day or nibble, but he was just existing. My wife and I took turns sleeping on the floor with him the last few months because he would need to go out but needed help in the middle of the night. I have never regretted one day the decision we made, if he could have talked he would have told me 'I love you, with all my heart, but it is time to let go of me, let me go rest, and I will see you again, you've done all you can do, it's ok Daddy'. My heart and prayers are with you. I pray for a peaceful and quiet passing, and I pray for comfort in your hearts knowing you are doing this because of the great love you have for Danny. Blessings to you.


Charlie
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Purzel
First off let me say how sorry I am for you having to go through this. The “final decision” and all the questions around it are not easy to answer. From what you write your sweet Danny boy is an old dog who has reached the end of his life and the question seems to be “how” rather than “when”.
 
So, here my own experience. My beloved Max had reached the end of his life and I knew it for quite some time. I personally have always opted for quality of life instead of quantity. Max ate and drank well  until his final day. But, he was nearly deaf, he had dementia, he broke down a few times staying unconcious for a few seconds, he was pacing around at night not finding peace, panting not finding decent sleep, caughing all the time. It had gotten to the point where I was scared to leave the house doing my groceries because he could not get up on his own once he slipped. Max was a very proud dog and I realized how hard it must have been for him to be that way.
 
Witnessing all those signs for some weeks I had arranged euthanasia beforehand with the vet coming to my home. Max did live another month after these arragements and the day he broke down again unable to move, I called the vet.
 
Max might have lived on and on like this for some more weeks but he was certainly not content anymore. And he did not move at all during “the procedure” but wagged his tail one last time when the vet talked to him. He went peacefully and within a nano-second.
 
In my mind, euthanasia is not murder. We have already prolonged life with all kinds of meds that some fine day just did not work anymore. My beloved Max’ time had come on that final day and it felt very right then and there to set him free.
 
Be sure that I did question my decision for quite some time afterwards but those were questions in favor of myself, not in favor of my beloved Max.
 
My heart goes out to you and your husband.
Silvia (with Max forever in my heart)

[hundi]


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Ginger4256
Mimi,
I am so sorry that you have to make this decision for your beloved Danny Boy.  All I can say is that tomorrow will be the worse day of your life so be prepared.  We are all here and I know firsthand that just coming here, reading other stories, helps you to realize that you are not alone and that it is perfectly normal to feel the way you will feel.  I wish you peace tonight and tomorrow.  Hug that Danny Boy.  
Boo' s mommy
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dachsiemom
Nine weeks ago I was where you are now.  My 15 year old dachshund, Brandon had Cushings disease and hyperparathyroidism, and had been declining for a little over a year.  One day I realized that he was much worse, and decided that the next day would be the day.  That night was the worst night I have ever suffered through.  I slept next to Brandon, as usual, knowing it would be our last night together.  The euthanasia was peaceful, as it usually is, and I had no regrets about my decision.  But I was devastated by the loss of my beloved companion.  The first few weeks were very rough for me, but despite my pain I knew that he needed to die.  In this case, I there was not really much of a decision.  Brandon had stopped eating and drinking; he was dying.  Euthanasia meant that death would be peaceful and comfortable for him, and that he would die in my arms with me telling him how much I loved him.  That was a final gift I could give to him. 
I also had a beautiful sheltie, who died three years ago.  For the last few weeks Willoughby was in the condition you have described about your Danny boy.  I would begin every day by cleaning the floor and him.  He was such a beautiful, good dog, and it was heart breaking to see him in such miserable condition.   The vet offered to do more tests, but I said no to that; Willoughby had suffered enough.  He had such terrible arthritis that just walking was probably quite painful.  His quality of life was very poor.  He no longer played, did not enjoy eating, and really had no interest in anything any more.  But he still loved us and would respond to us. 
It sounds as if you know what needs to be done.  I also wish you peace tomorrow and in the coming weeks.  -  Dachsiemom    
Moira - remembering Brandon
"Better lo'ed ye canna be. Will ye no' come back again?"
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Mackysmum
Hi first off im very sorry your facing this with your sweet Danny boy it truly is the most difficult decision one has to make , i really do feel for you , its absoulty horrible to even think about let alone making that final decision.

I faced this same decision 11 weeks ago now , my dog macky was 15 and a half
Macky was born with congenial hip dysiplaysa so he had always had flare ups of limping throughout his life from 6 months old , but in the last 2 years of his life his hip dysiplaysa became alot worse he also developed cataracts in both eyes .
In the last 6 months of mackys life his back legs became so much more worse were he wouldn't walk his normal bush walk we did twice daily , he could only muster a short 5 minute walk , he loved loved loved his walks .
Also he became more blind and his seemed to devople dementia type symptoms
The last month my macky seemed to go down really fast , his legs got worse and his blindness got much worse , he also started barking non stop all day in to the night , i had to sedatate him it was so horrible to see .
I saw the vet and she said his barking was anxiety most likely from going blind and his legs being so bad and dementia.
I tried many medications and natural stuff in desperation but nothing fixed him , the vauilm did help his anxiety ,, but it killed me seeing him so drugged up and he would off hated it.
Dispete him being on the highest safest dose of melcocam/ mobic for his hip dysiplaysa pain , in that last week he couldn't get up without me lifting him up even on carpet
In the last couple of days he couldn't even squat to poo so he wouldn't poo in the last 2 days , he even held it in that whole time , he never soiled himself .

His final day , i just 100% knew it was his time , he looked absent and he was tired very tired , he still could not squat to poo and a wee he was wobbling on his back legs , it killed me to watch this , i couldn't continue with it for him not me .
Another thing was when i took him outside to go to the toilet , he did a pee then flopped down on the grass and would bother back up he stayed there for ages .
I took him inside and rang my vet to come to my house to put him to sleep, at home.

God that was hard to re live

I have not regreated my decision as i know it would of been cruel and dis loyal to let macky live just for me to have him longer .
Macky was my first loss of loosing someone , it was overwhelming but completely right for my sweet boy.

You said people say you will know when it's time / they tell you , in my case macky did tell me he showed me with his lack of energy , his blank look and the fact he didn't want to get up , he told me .

It sounds like your boy has aged and is tired as well its hard if they still carry put normal things at times , macky still was eating and drinking , he even are a ice cream a few hours before he passed , still was do super excited to see me and kissed me like he always did . But it did not out weigh his discomfort.

I'm not sure if my story of loosing my special boy was helpful in your decision
I do send you comfort in these days/ weeks ahead

P.s. Kiss your boy so much and cuddle him and tell him how much you love him ,,, i wish I had off did all that so much more then I did ,, i was so stressed I did not think to over love him cause i didmt believe he would leave ...
Hugs to you
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Cockermom
Cockermom wrote:
My husband and I, after several times of saying to each other "It's time", finally made an appointment for tomorrow (6/2) to help our Danny boy (15 year old Cocker Spaniel) cross over.     Besides being 15 and having a heart murmur, his eyesight is almost gone and his cognitive responses slowing, and he has been suffering with Cushings Disease for the past 18 months.  The muscle in his back legs is almost gone and he now collapses regularly trying to walk. He gets stuck on the floor and has trouble (if at all) getting back up,  and recently he's been getting stuck trying to go through the doggie door.  He has been stuck in his own bed and on the floor in his own feces and I end up having to wisk him off to the bathroom to put him in the tub. He even collapses and poops while I bathe him!  His skin is all crusty and he has been quite cranky with our new rescue pup. He's on all sorts of medications, including pain meds.   He still eats and drinks most of the time, although it is hard for him to keep his body stable enough to eat as he has to sit down.  Here's the challenge: When he collapses and we pick him back up, he teeters off wagging his little tail like "the little engine who could"!  This is what is making me ache inside.  His attitude and his determination is so amazing, but his body, and now at times his mind, just seem to be failing him.  We work during the day and have a camera on him, but I fear I will log on and see him stuck in the dog door or floor and be helpless to assist him.  I have kind of prayed he would just pass on his own. Euthanasia just feels like (dare I use this word-murder?!).   We had to have his litter mate euthanized last March for cancer but it is not any easier.    I don't want to have regrets, but I don't want my boy to suffer any longer.  This does not feel like a dignified quality of life.    Just hearing someone else's experience would be helpful.  I know they say "you'll know when it's time" and I'm already second guessing myself again.
Mimi Zwart
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