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jinx82

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Posts: 17
Reply with quote  #1 
Our dog just passed away suddenly from cancer. We didn't even know she had it. We took her in for something else entirely and came home empty. There was a tumor on her spleen and her abdomen. What I don't understand is how canines get cancer? I know there isn't enough research but I am racking my brain trying to figure out how she got this. 
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Hillorie Brauch
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joannebasiole

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Reply with quote  #2 
Hi, So sorry for ur loss. I feel your pain, I can relate to what you are saying. I loss my baby 11/30/2012. His name is Jax. He is a Jack Russell Terrier, 11yrs old. He had the spleen tumor surgery. He passed away in recovery. I also took him to the vet on an unrelated issue. The vet found that, Jax had a spleen, liver tumor and cancer on his pancreas. I did not know when I left Jax there for spleen tumor surgery. I was never going to bring Jax home. I was not going to see him again. (sigh) I believe it could be from pesticides, dog food, treats or toys. Who can say? My vet couldnt give me an answer to that question. Its like humans, how do we get cancer or tumors? I see now that there are way too many dogs with spleen tumors some Hemangiosarcomas and some benigh. I have been trying to figure out how Jax got it. I stopped trying.  It will only drive you nuts and interfer with the grieving process.
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Joanne Basile
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marrinb1712

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Reply with quote  #3 
We have recently had a similar experience. Our Rosie (the lovable Lab) was fine at Christmas time, happy and bouncing despite her almost 10 years of loving life.  By the 29th she had lost 8 pounds, wasn't eating, still drinking water, but having difficulties urinating. We took her to the vet asap and the results were so muddied because the x-ray's didn't show anything except one very small lump in her small intestines that the vet said could even be stool, but fluid was accumulating in her abdomen.  We were referred to a specialist for a special diagnostic ultrasound of her abdomen and fine needle biopsy. The results came back positive for lymphatic carcinoma. We were shocked!  She had been fine, walking several times a week, out in the back yard barking at the squirrel that climbs our tree, normal Rosie stuff that she always did.  The prognosis was very poor due to her weight loss and age (9 1/2).  With the prognosis the vet gave us, I wouldn't put her through chemotherapy, she was inoperable as a 'high risk patient' - and, being in the lymph glands, the cancer wouldn't have been gone any way. I decided to try the third option the vet gave of of steriods to shrink the cancer cells, improve her appetite, help her to gain enough weight to may be entertain the idea of chemo.  When it became clear to me yesterday, I couldn't even get her medication in her, she spit up when she tried to drink water, she fell as she staggered down the hallway to the living room and sort of collapsed on the hardwood floor in the kitchen, I knew.  I was heartbroken to euthanize her, but could see she was wasting away in front of me, never crying, never moaning, never complaining, but in clear discomfort. She was our Queen Bee, our Sweet Rosie girl. I don't get it either, I guess it's all part of the cycle of life.  With so many animals out there who no ones cares about - or those who have been treated badly by people, why was it OUR Rosie who had to die?  I may live my life wondering WHY???
I know we all grieve differently and have to go through the stages, denial, anger....all the way to acceptance, but it is so hard. The only gift I could give her yesterday, besides my undying love for her, was to let her go, end her pain and embrace my grief while I comfort my daughter through this as well.  We will have another pet, may be two (at a time), that doesn't replace the love you feel for the pet you lost.  Our Rosie, will forever be, OUR ROSIE.  Her picture, sharp and clear, stands on our piano along with all our family members and will NEVER be removed.

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Barb Marrin
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llkelly

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Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #4 
I also had a similiar experience with our dog Toby, who was perfectly fine and healthy (or so we thought) until he started having seizures one evening.  Twelve hours later he was gone.  We believe he had a tumor on his spleen that burst causing internal bleeding.  Toby died on the table minutes before the doctor was to take his spleen out.  I have asked so many questions and have done so much research to ask the same question "why"?  Why so much cancer in our pets?  Why were there no signs?  Why could I not help him?  It's been a little over 5 weeks and I am still in denial.   Toby was 8 1/2.  I feel so cheated to have lost him so suddenly, but then again, I am so relieved he did not suffer.  He still chased birds, squirrels and played frisbee all the way up until his last day.  I also do not understand.  I miss him so much .....  
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marrinb1712

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Reply with quote  #5 
There is no real answer to the questions we all ask.  From what our Vet told us, animals instinctively mask their discomfort and pain because in the wild it makes them more vulnerable to predators, it's hardwired in them. Had she cried, whimpered, whined - any sign, we would have taken Rosie in immediately for exam and, hopefully treatment. 
I tried to put this in perspective yesterday as much as I could, our hearts broken from her loss. She was my best friend, followed me from room to room, watched as I made beds and washed dishes.
I've done a little research and our Rosie was a mixed Lab-Rottweiler, but with total Lab personality. Golden's seem to have a higher risk for cancers, but ours was a black Lab, not golden. I've joined an organization that is dedicated to finding the answers to the questions we all ask, and have made a small donation in Rosie's memory to assist this nonprofit foundation - The Morris Animal Foundation.  They fund research to find treatments, prevention and cures for our pets and are starting a new research study with Golden Retrievers - but are dedicated good health for all animals. I highly recommend them.  It won't help the pets we've lost, but could save lives as their research studies move forward.

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Barb Marrin
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