Lamont
It's been 3 weeks since we put our sweet Bertie down. She lost her life due to complications of  Feline Hyperthyroidism. "FH" or "Hyper-T" is now one of the most common ailments seen in mature cats 8-10 years old, and mostly in females.
I don't claim to be an expert on this, but have tried to learn as much as I can about what causes this damaging, and often fatal disease, as well as what the treatment options are.

I have found that like many feline ailments, Hyper-T often goes undiagnosed until our cats are showing obvious signs. Cats are known for being good at hiding disabilities and illness, and the onset of Hyper-T is often a gradual one. Unfortunately, that often means that your cat has already developed high blood pressure, kidney damage, heart problems, all due to the HyperThyroidism before you notice they are not well.

I have seen a lot of articles, medical studies but this one I found and read today, by Ron Hines DVM is about as concise as any. It describes in plain English what Hyper-T is, the possible causes and the treatment options.

In retrospect, I can see how we missed the early signs of Bertie's illness, mistaking her restlessness as "her personality". Bertie's vet also missed many of the signs at her check ups.  Of course we were ok with no expensive labs, just for the sake of doing them, and the vet didn't seem to concerned about her heart murmur. (The first sign that something was wrong). Anyway, fast forward a few years to this past Summer, when the "substitute" vet saw her and ordered a battery of tests, which confirmed she had Hyper-T.

Many of you have cats that have already been diagnosed with this, or have, like us, lost your cat to this devastating disease. But I wanted to pass on this article to anyone who may have questions about it.


Hyperthyroidism, It's Cause and Treatment Ron Hines DVM PhD
http://www.2ndchance.info/hyperthyroid.htm

Let me just add a big thank you to Ginny, who runs this site. It's a great service to many.
L
Bertie's Daddy
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Lamont
Posting this article about how to prevent Hyperthyroidism caused by PDBE flame retardant chemicals.
Our furniture, carpet and some building materials contain these chemicals that are linked to FHT , mostly in house cats. There are also studies showing that canned cat food containing "fish flavored' ingredients are a source of PDBE chemicals and other bromides.  Some say it's also in the lining of the cans it is packaged in. 
This article outlines some steps you can take to mitigate or reduce exposure.


https://goo.gl/B9sUZQ
Bertie's Daddy
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