regglynn

We rescued an 11 year old female chihuahua last year. She was placed in a shelter due to her age. 

We quickly fell in love with her and renamed her Sassy. She lived up to her name. Although overweight, she was spunky, demanding, and a little diva.  


The weekend of July 4th we noticed she wasn’t herself. She wasn’t in distress, just more quiet than usual. Then she began to have accidents around the house was was not her normal. 


took her to the vet where she was diabetes with diabetes and a bad UTI. They sent us home Tuesday with antibiotics and insulin. They also gave us instructions n how to administer her insulin. Since she wasn’t eating, they said no insulin until she eats.  

Wednesday still not eating. Called the vet. Instructed to not give insulin and give her time. 

Thursday still not eating. Called vet again and they said give her some syrup. They said her sugar is probably low since she isn’t eating.  Thursday night she still didn’t seem in distress and still walked to her water bowl and out to pee. They said if she didn’t eat by tomorrow take her to an emergency vet  

Friday she changed. Couldn’t stand. Couldn’t walk. Shaking. Could barely hold her head up. Took her to the emergency vet. She was diagnosed with diabetic keto acidosis. The emergency vet gave us two option. Try fluids and an insulin drip which probably would not save her. Or euthanasia. We choose euthanasia.

As they prepared her I felt like I was killing her. I gave her syrup like the other vet told me. I even showed the emergency vet the message and instructions on my phone. She said she didn’t understand why they told me to give the syrup.

With a Cather in her foot, she left this world with a small grunt while I was crying my eyes out. 

Now I can’t stop blaming myself. I feel like I killed her by giving her syrup. I can’t stop crying. 

We loved her. And now I feel so guilty over the syrup and the euthanasia. Did I make the right decision? Did I kill my dog with syrup. Why didn’t the vet tell me to bring her in to check her blood sugar? Why did she grunt at the end?

Does she know we loved her? 
I need help getting over this pain. She wasn’t just a dog. She was my little girl. 

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Lynn_E
You were only following instructions & thought you were only trying to help. I have lots of questions too; my cat died suddenly Friday evening and he was only 7. He was my little boy. I’m so sorry for your loss. You didn’t kill your little girl. She had a disease and you gave her a wonderful last few moments of life. It is not your fault. You mentioned she was overweight and she had been diagnosed with diabetes. I hope you will find peace and comfort knowing you rescued her and took great care of her. She knows this, in time, you will too.  
Lynn, Peter’s mom 
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Lynn_E
I’m sorry this was my very first post. I forgot to mention about the grunt at the very end. I know we have questions and uncertainties in our lives & a lot of the time we might not ever have the answers. When we put our family dog down he let out a big yelp & was crying & I wish we knew why. Maybe with Sassy it was her last little bark for you, simply just acknowledging your presence. Or it was her body relaxing and letting go. I’m sorry I know you would like to know why. I hope you can be strong even without all the answers. Please take care 
Lynn, Peter’s mom 
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grievingmama

Diabetes is a very difficult endocrine disease, especially in older dogs. It comes on out of nowhere and is usually found during an acute diabetic crisis. My dog was fine on routine blood work one month before he was admitted to the ER and diagnosed with sudden diabetes. Like your dog, he was in ketoacidosis when admitted. I had to put my boy down 1.5 weeks after he came home from hospital. I did the emergency treatment and I still lost him to complications, so I want you to know that just because there is "treatment" available it doesn't guarantee a positive outcome.

We are not always told the 'whole picture' with this disease (and others) - I've learned most by researching diseases and treatments myself. The other issue you should know, when an animal is diagnosed with diabetes, it typically takes 3 - 6 months to properly regulate them. During that time their bodies are under extreme stress from high blood sugar, which can effect all systems and organs and cause a whole host of systemic health issues. Statistically, only 50% of animals survive the first 60 days after diagnosis and go on to be successfully treated at home. We are told diabetes is a manageable disease, which it absolutely can be, but only once regulated. Until that time it is high risk and there are no guarantees even after regulation that your dog won't suffer from unpredictable glucose levels - too high = deadly, too low = deadly. It's a double edge sword. All of this to say, it is highly unlikely that you giving a small amount of syrup to your dog, even while in a high glucose state, would have been the cause of the blood sugar crisis. One of the many difficulties with this disease is that an animal who doesn't feel well won't eat, and if they won't eat they cannot have insulin. it is a terrible situation you were and you dog were in. I hope you can find peace. It is never easy to say goodbye to our fur-kids. xx

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